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Category: Business Matters

Get a business health check at the start of the tax year

Get a business health check at the start of the tax year

Using up personal allowances is not the only reason you should see your accountant at the start of the tax year, it is also the best time to get a health and wealth check for your business too.

The end of the tax year is the busiest time for your business and your accountant, meaning devoting time and effort to checking whether your business is on track is sadly lacking.

Take the time while you have the time

However, the complete opposite is the case at the start of the tax year, so now is the time to make the most of the chance to review your business strategy, cashflow and plans for the coming year to ensure your company has the best chance of success.

What can your accountant help you with?

Your accountant is perfectly placed to help you put an effective plan in place to give your business the boost it needs at the start of the tax year. He or she can help you with everything from saving tax and paying the right amount of tax, right the way through to helping you comply with relevant regulations and improving your cashflow.

Accessing funding

A good accountant can also help you access relevant funding – whether that is a grant that your business would qualify for or an investor that would help your business to grow.

Setting out an effective business plan at the beginning of your financial year is like creating a road map for the coming months, allowing you to follow that map to achieve your goals.

We can help your business run smoothly

When things get tough, your accountant is there to help you with everything from advice to reality checks so your business can continue to run smoothly.

If you want help to set your business on the right path for this tax year, then please get in touch and find out how we can help you.

May 9, 2022

MTD D-Day has arrived – here’s how to make sure you comply

MTD D-Day has arrived – here’s how to make sure you comply

Anyone filing VAT returns from April 1, 2022 onwards now has to file their return digitally as HMRC’s Making Tax Digital reaches its next phase.

All businesses registered for VAT – even if they have turnover below the threshold – must file their returns this way from now on. The premise for changing to the MTD regime is to reduce the number of common mistakes made, according to HMRC, and will save taxpayers time when it comes to managing their tax affairs.

However, it is also a key plank of digitising the UK’s tax regime, and MTD is likely to have increased revenue to HMRC thanks to reduced errors in both 2019 and 2020, said HMRC.

Sign up now if you haven’t yet

Nearly 1.6m taxpayers had already joined MTD for VAT as of December 2021, and more than 11m returns have already been submitted this way. Around a third of those businesses with a turnover below the £85,000 VAT threshold signed up before April 1, 2022 and “thousands more are signing up each week”, said HMRC.

Lucy Frazer, Financial Secretary to the Treasury, said: “Businesses using MTD are saving time on their tax affairs, streamlining their processes, and boosting their productivity as a result.

“[This is] our first move towards a modern, digital tax service – MTD makes it easier for businesses to get their tax right first time. There is a range of support and information available for those that need it – including accessible online content such as YouTube videos, GOV.UK help pages and HMRC’s Extra Support service.

“Agents can sign up on behalf of a business, although businesses remain responsible for meeting their VAT obligations. Those who do not join may be charged a penalty for failure to do so.”

Businesses must sign up before they send their next VAT return

Any businesses that have not yet signed up need to before they file their first VAT return after April 1, 2022. There are a number of software options that can be used, including free options for the easiest of calculations, or more advanced for more complex affairs, said HMRC.

list of software compatible with MTD for VAT is on Gov.UK and there are webinars being run by HMRC for taxpayers who need more help and support on signing up for MTD to make sure they comply.

There are some exemptions

Some VAT-registered businesses can receive exemptions, primarily where it is not reasonable or practical for them to use digital tools for their tax. These include reasons based on age or disability, or a religious objection to using computers. But any other reasonable basis for exemption will be considered by HMRC. You can find more information on whether an exemption may apply on Gov.UK.

While you are waiting for a final decision, continue to file your returns as you usually do.

MTD for income tax 2024

MTD is being extended to 4.2m income taxpayers who are landlords, sole traders and partnerships from 2024. Anyone with business and/or property income over £10,000 will be brought into the regime then. So, it is worth starting to plan ahead with your accountant to make sure this transition is as smooth as possible.

Contact us

Please get in touch with us to find out how we can help you if you are yet to sign up for MTD. We can help you comply with the new rules.

May 3, 2022

Strong Customer Authentication (SCA) rules – what they mean for businesses and consumers

Strong Customer Authentication (SCA) rules – what they mean for businesses and consumers

You may have already noticed when you are buying things online that you are now being asked to confirm your purchase in more than one way to improve security, and this is the result of the new Strong Customer Authentication (SCA) regulations which came into effect on 14 March 2022.

What are the SCA regulations?

The SCA regulations create an additional layer of security for card payments which involve a second method of identification. This could be a text message with a code that needs to be added to a purchase, a phone call to a landline, or via a card reader or smartphone app. The aim is to reduce the amount of fraud and make customer transactions safer.

The effect on businesses

There is, of course, an impact on customers directly. But all companies who sell directly to consumers via card purchases have had to make some changes to their technology too. Retailers should have already upgraded their payment gateways and payment services providers have been working towards helping achieve this.

Declined transactions

From 14 March 2022, any transaction that is not SCA compliant will be declined, which would be costly to retailers. If you are still having problems with this for your business, then you urgently need some help.

Find out how we can help you

If you want to know more about SCA or have any problems implementing it, then please get in touch and we will do what we can to help you.

April 25, 2022

Bank of England (BoE) base rate rises to 0.75% – what it means for consumers and businesses

Bank of England (BoE) base rate rises to 0.75% – what it means for consumers and businesses

The Bank of England (BoE) base rate rose to 0.75% in March in response to Consumer Prices Index (CPI) inflation rising to 5.5% – almost triple the BoE’s target of 2%. Inflation is set to continue rising throughout the year (see Spring Statement round-up) with the Russian invasion of Ukraine creating increased pressure on already rising prices.

What does it mean for you?

Any rise in the base rate has an impact on borrowing rates for businesses and individuals, and on savings rates. Each is likely to rise – great news for savers, not such great news for borrowers.

How will borrowers be affected?

Any loan you have that does not have a fixed rate – such as some mortgages, personal loans or credit card debt, for example – could face a rise in interest rates if the company providing this chooses to pass this rate on. And many will.

However, if you have a fixed-rate mortgage, unsecured personal loan or other loan, for example, then you will not see these rates change until you reach the end of the offer term or until the loan is paid off.

How are savers affected?

If you have savings in a fixed-rate account, these will not rise either. But if your savings are in a non-fixed interest rate account, then you could see the interest you are paid on this rise.

If you see a better rate than you are being paid elsewhere, then it is worth considering moving your savings to the better-paying account. But bear in mind if you are in a fixed-rate account, you could face a penalty for doing this which could negate the benefit of moving. So, check with an expert before taking any action.

Safety net

You also need to consider how much of your money is in each institution. The Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS) covers your money on deposit with a single institution up to £85,000. But you need to be aware that various brands come under one institution – such as Halifax and TSB coming under the Lloyds Banking Group.

You would be covered up to £85,000 across all these accounts, not in each. It only becomes relevant if one of the banks goes bust, but we know from experience that however unlikely, this can happen. So, it is something to bear in mind.

Find out how we can help you

If you are unsure about whether your money is working as hard for you as it could, then please feel free to get in touch and we will help you in any way we can.

April 20, 2022

Bounce-back loans – where are we now?

Bounce-back loans – where are we now?

The bounce back loans, CBILS and CLBILS for larger companies were some of the most generous schemes available to businesses suffering from the impact of lockdowns due to the Covid-19 pandemic, paying out a total of £80 billion to help keep businesses afloat.

The Bounce Back Loan Scheme was the largest of these, paying out £47.36 billion in total to around 1.6m recipients, with amounts up to £50,000 available to companies that would have faced real financial difficulty without them.

Fraudulent loan claims

Due to the speed that these loan schemes were implemented, and the fact that the Government backed them 100% – meaning taxpayers would pick up the tab for any loans that were not repaid – there was predicted to be a considerable amount of fraud. PwC initial suggested there would be around £4.9 billion of fraud associated with the Bounce Back Loan Scheme, which it subsequently reduced to £3.5 billion.

Lord Agnew, the former minister for counter-fraud described the oversight of the loan payments by the British Business Bank as “nothing short of woeful” when he spoke about his resignation from that role in the House of Lords. He highlighted what he described as “schoolboy errors” such as more than 1,000 companies receiving these loans despite not even trading when the pandemic hit.

What to watch out for if you need additional business loans

However, for the millions of companies these loans helped, there has been considerable benefit. They were applied for through business banks and you could get up to 25% of the self-certified annual turnover, or £50,000 – whichever was less. The biggest appeal for many though was the 2.5% interest rate – lower than many other business loans available – and the option to repay the loan over six years, although you can request that this is extended to 10 years, with the Government covering interest payments for the first 12 months.

One important thing for companies to remember is that the interest on these loans can be offset against tax, which is one benefit. But there are a few banana skins to avoid if you need additional lending within the period that you have the loan, according to the Association of Taxation Technicians (ATT).

It said: “Be particularly careful if your business needs any other source of funding during the life of the BBL taking any form of security, mortgage, charge pledge, lien or encumbrance over its assets whatsoever. You must check this is allowed under the loan terms, and often it is not.”

Be careful if your business becomes insolvent

It was possible to use the BBLS to pay dividends if the business has retained profits but was struggling with cash flow, but if your company was to become insolvent then you may be asked to repay these dividends as it is not possible to pay a dividend from an insolvent company. Any personal use of these loans could also result in the requirement to repay the money used, which potentially puts your personal assets at risk.

We can help you

If you are concerned that your BBLS may not have been used for the correct purpose, or that business risks could leave your company insolvent and you personally exposed due to the way the loan was used, then please contact us and we will explain the best course of action.

March 7, 2022

Businesses must prepare as wider creditor action protections end in March

Businesses must prepare as wider creditor action protections end in March

Companies with debts outside of their rental arrears face the removal of protection against creditor actions from March 31, 2022.

Other debts outside rental arrears affected

Currently, rent arrears built up because of forced closures as a result of COVID-19 are excluded from these measures, as they are covered by other legislation

Any debts outside of rent arrears, must reach a £10,000 threshold before a winding-up petition can be filed. Before the filing, the creditor must have given the debtor a notice – called a Schedule 10 Notice – which states that if a proposal for payment of the debt has not been made within 21 days of the notice, then the creditor intends to file a winding-up petition.

Firms must prepare to deal with possible litigation from April 2022

However, these restrictions end on March 31, so any business with debts of more than £10,000 that are not related to rent arrears needs to be sure it is prepared for these protections to be removed, unless more legislation is passed before that date.

Challenges could be made for as little as £750 owed

Law firm Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer highlighted that the Government has not changed the threshold to serve a statutory demand for winding-up from £750. So, while the current legislation is in place there are two thresholds in place for the compulsory winding-up process. But once Schedule 10 notices are repealed, the lower level of £750 remains.

Find out how we can help you

If you have debts outside of rental arrears that have built up due to difficult trading conditions during the pandemic, or because of forced closures, then please contact us to find out how we can help you manage this most effectively for your business.

February 21, 2022

SSP changes

SSP changes

To help employers affected by the spread of the Omicron variant of COVID-19, the Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) rebate scheme for small employers is being reintroduced. In addition, the period for which an employee can self-certify a sickness absence is increased temporarily from seven days to 28 days.

SSP rebate scheme

The SSP rebate scheme for small employers allowed employers who had fewer than 250 employees on their payroll on 28 February 2020 to reclaim up to two weeks’ SSP per employee in respect of Coronavirus absences. Normally, employers must meet the cost of any SSP paid to an employee in full. The original scheme applied in respect of Coronavirus absences prior to 30 September 2021, with a deadline for making rebate claims of 31 December 2021.

To help employers affected by staff absences as a result of the surge in COVID-19 cases following the emergence of the Omicron variant, the SSP rebate scheme for small employers is being resurrected. You will be able to use the scheme if you are based in the UK and you had a PAYE scheme with fewer than 250 employees as of 30 November 2021. As previously, you will be able to claim back the cost of up to two weeks’ SSP paid to an employee for Coronavirus-related absences. The claim period is being reset; consequently, a claim can be made in respect of SSP paid to an employee, regardless of whether a claim was made under the original scheme. Claims under the resurrected scheme can be made retrospectively from mid-January 2022.

Self-certification

The period for which an employee is able to self-certify an absence for SSP purposes has been increased temporarily from seven days to 28 days. This means that rather than needing a Fit Note from a GP for absences of more than seven days, employees will only need a Fit Note once they have been absent for 28 days. This will reduce the pressure on GPs.

Regulations have been introduced to give statutory effect to the relaxation, which applies for periods of sickness which begin on or after 17 December 2021 and end on or before 26 January 2022. Thereafter, the self-certification period will revert to seven days.  

Speak to us

To find out more about how to make a claim under the SSP rebate scheme, or to learn more about the temporary self-certification rules, please speak to us.

January 24, 2022

Help if you are struggling to pay your tax bill

Help if you are struggling to pay your tax bill

Financially, 2021 has been a difficult year for many, and you may be struggling to pay your January tax bill in full. Any tax and National Insurance that remains unpaid for 2020/21 must be paid by 31 January 2022, along with the first payment on account for 2021/22.

Contact HMRC

If you cannot pay your tax bill on time, you should contact HMRC as soon as possible – you do not need to wait until the payment is late, and it is advisable not to do so. You will be able to discuss the help that is available to you, and may be able to pay what you owe in instalments by setting up a Time to Pay arrangement.

Time to Pay arrangements

A Time to Pay arrangement is an agreement with HMRC to pay the tax that you owe in instalments. The procedure for setting up a Time to Pay arrangement depends on the type of tax that you owe and the amount that you owe.

Self-assessment

If you are unable to pay your self-assessment tax bill, you may be able to set up a Time to Pay arrangement up online via your Government Gateway account. You can do this if:

  • you have filed your latest tax return;
  • you owe less than £30,000;
  • you are within 60 days of the payment deadline; and
  • you plan to pay off your tax debt within the next 12 months, or less.

This is the most straightforward way to arrange to pay what you owe in instalments. To avoid triggering unnecessary late payment penalties, if you know that you will struggle to meet your 31 January 2022 tax bill, it is advisable to ensure that your return is filed in good time so that a Time to Pay arrangement can be in place by this date.   

Unable to make an online arrangement?

If you are unable to set up a Time to Pay arrangement online, for example, if the tax that you owe is more than £30,000, you may be able to agree an instalment payment plan by calling HMRC’s self-assessment helpline on 0300 200 3822.

Other types of tax

If you owe tax other than that due under self-assessment, or if your company cannot pay tax that it owes, you can contact HMRC’s Payment Support Service on 0300 200 3835 to discuss setting up a Time to Pay arrangement.

Information required

To set up a Time to Pay arrangement you will need to have the following information to hand:

  • your unique tax reference number;
  • your VAT registration number if you are a VAT-registered business;
  • your bank account details; and
  • details of any previous payments that you have missed.

HMRC will ask you a number of questions, including:

  • how much you can afford to repay each month;
  • whether you are able to pay what you owe in full;
  • whether there are any other tax bills that you need to pay;
  • how much money you earn;
  • how much you usually spend each month; and
  • what savings and investments you have.

HMRC expect that if you are able to pay the tax that you owe, you will do so. Also, if you have any savings or assets, they expect that you will use those to meet your tax obligations.  

Where you are unable to pay what you owe in full, HMRC will usually set your monthly payments at about 50% of the money you have left over each month after you have paid your bills.

Once a Time to Pay agreement is in place, it is important that you pay at least the agreed amount each month. If you are able, you can pay more than the agreed amount if you want to clear the debt more quickly.

Unable to agree a Time to Pay arrangement?

If you are unable to agree a Time to Pay arrangement with HMRC, for example, if HMRC do not think you will stick to the agreement because you have defaulted in the past, you will be asked to pay what you owe in full. If you are unable to do this, HMRC may take enforcement action to collect the debt.

We can help

If you are struggling to pay tax that you owe or are worried about being able to pay your January self-assessment bill, talk to us. We can help you set up a plan to pay in instalments.

January 10, 2022

Company cars and vans

Company cars and vans

A tax charge may arise if an employee is able to use a company car or van for private use. A further charge will arise if you provide the fuel for any private use. The taxable amounts that will apply for 2022/23 have now been announced.

Company cars

Where an employee has a company car, if that car is available for their private use, they are taxed on the benefit of that private use.

The amount that is charged to tax is a percentage (the appropriate percentage) of the car’s list price and any optional accessories (as reduced for any capital contributions up to £5,000). The charge is reduced where the car is not available for the full year, and also for any private use contributions made by the employee.

The appropriate percentage depends on the car’s carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. A supplement of 4% applies to diesel cars not meeting the RDE2 standard. The appropriate percentage is capped at 37%.

The appropriate percentages applying for 2022/23 are available on the Gov.uk website.

Electric cars

For 2022/23, electric cars are taxed on 2% of their list price, regardless of the date of first registration.

Fuel charge

If the employee is provided with fuel for private journeys, a separate fuel benefit charge applies. The taxable amount is the appropriate percentage used to calculate the car benefit charge multiplied by the set figure for the tax year. For 2022/23, this is £25,300.

There is no charge if you pay for electricity for private use of an electric company car.

Company vans

If you provide an employee with a company van, and they have unrestricted private use of that van, unless the van is an electric van, a tax charge will arise. For 2022/23, the taxable amount is £3,500. If you also provide fuel for private journeys, a separate fuel charge arises. For 2022/23, this is valued at £688.

There is no charge where an employee uses an electric company van for private use.

Get in touch

We can help you understand how to provide tax efficient company cars and vans to your employees.

December 20, 2021

Seasonal gifts to employees

Seasonal gifts to employees

Christmas is a time of giving, and you may wish to give your employees a small token of your appreciation for their work during the year. To prevent the gift being accompanied by an unwanted tax liability, you can take advantage of the trivial benefits exemption to keep the gift tax-free.

Scope of the exemption

Where you provide an employee with a low-cost benefit, the employee is not taxed on the provision of that benefit as long as the following conditions are met:

  • the benefit is not cash or a cash voucher;
  • the cost of the benefit is not more than £50;
  • the benefit is not made available to the employee under a salary sacrifice arrangement or under a contractual obligation; and
  • the benefit is not provided in recognition of particular services being performed, or in anticipation of them being performed.

Benefits that meet these conditions are known as trivial benefits.

Where the conditions are met, if the recipient is a director of a close company, the total value of tax-free trivial benefits that they can enjoy in the tax year is capped at £300. Otherwise, there is no limit on the number of trivial benefits which can be given to an employee tax-free each year.

Application of the exemption to Christmas gifts

The trivial benefits exemption can be used to ensure that gifts typically given to employees at Christmas, such as chocolates, wine, a turkey or a hamper, can be given tax-free. The key is to keep the cost below £50.

It will normally be straightforward to work out the cost of an item, but where it is difficult to determine the individual cost, the average cost can be used instead.

Lavish gifts

The trivial benefits exemption only applies if you give modest gifts costing £50 or less; lavish gifts will fall outside the exemption. The £50 limit is not a tax-free allowance, and if the cost of the gift is more than £50, the full amount will be taxable, not just the excess over £50. For example, if you give your employees a Christmas hamper costing £200, the taxable amount is £200, not £150 (the excess over £50).

If you do wish to give your employees an expensive Christmas gift, you may wish to pay the associated tax on their behalf by including it within a PAYE Settlement Agreement.

The gift card trap

To enable employees to choose their own gift, you may prefer to give a gift card or access to an app which lets them choose a treat. However, it is necessary to tread carefully here. If an employee uses an app or is given a gift card which may be topped up, the cost of the benefit is the total cost in the tax year, not the cost each time the app or gift card is used. This may mean that while each individual item purchased from the app or gift card costs less than £50, if the annual cost is more than £50, the benefit will not be a trivial benefit, and the exemption will not be available.

Speak to us

To check whether your Christmas gifts fall within the scope of the exemption, please get in touch.

December 13, 2021

Tax checks for licence renewal applications

Tax checks for licence renewal applications

From 4 April 2022, applicants applying to renew certain licences will need to pass a tax check before their licence application can be considered. Initially, the requirement will only apply in England and Wales. However, the Government have consulted on extending the requirements to Scotland and Northern Ireland from 2023.

Licences affected

Tax conditionality (the need to pass a tax check before a licence is renewed) will apply to licences to:

  • drive taxi and private hire vehicles (such as mini cabs);
  • operate a private hire vehicle business;
  • carry on the business of a scrap metal dealer on a site; and
  • carry on business as a mobile collector of scrap metal.

The check will only apply to licence renewal applications, not to first-time applications. However, the licensing authority will need to provide first-time applicants with information on what they need to do to comply with their tax obligations, and check that the applicant has received that information, before considering the licence application.

Nature of the tax check

The new tax check will apply in addition to the existing requirements imposed by the licensing authority. The purpose of the check is to confirm that the applicant is registered for tax. The check should only need to be completed about once every three years.

If you are applying to renew a licence on or after 4 April 2022, you will be able to complete the check, which will comprise a few short questions, via your Government Gateway account. The Government are to make guidance on completing the check available on the Gov.uk website. A helpline will also be available.

Once you have completed the check, you will be given a code. The code is important, and you must give it to your licensing authority as they are unable to progress your licence renewal application without it.

HMRC will inform the licensing authority whether you have passed the tax check. However, they will not provide them with any details of your tax affairs.

Plan ahead

In preparation for the introduction of tax conditionality, it is advisable to ensure that your tax affairs are in order, and get them up to date if they are not. HMRC have published a communications pack explaining what this will mean for licence applicants. It is worth a read.

We can help

If you will be required to pass the tax check in order to renew a licence that you need to operate your business, we can help you ensure that your tax affairs are in order.

November 22, 2021

New VAT rate for hospitality and leisure

New VAT rate for hospitality and leisure

To help the hospitality and leisure industries recover from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated lockdowns, a reduced rate of VAT of 5% applied from 15 July 2020 until 30 September 2021. This rate has now come to an end, and a new reduced rate of 12.5% applies from 1 October 2021 until 31 March 2022. The rate of VAT applicable to this sector will return to the standard rate of 20% from 1 April 2022.

Supplies benefitting from the reduced rate

You are able to take advantage of the reduced rate of 12.5% if you make supplies of any of the following:

  • food and non-alcoholic beverages sold for on-premises consumption, for example, in restaurants, cafes and pubs;
  • hot takeaway food and hot takeaway non-alcoholic beverages;
  • sleeping accommodation in hotels or similar establishments, holiday accommodation, pitch fees for caravans and tents, and associated facilities; and
  • admissions to cultural attractions that do not already benefit from the cultural VAT exemption, such as theatres, circuses, fairs, amusement parks, concerts, museums, zoos, cinemas, exhibitions and other similar cultural events and facilities.

However, if the admission to an attraction is within the existing cultural VAT exemption, the exemption applies rather than the reduced rate of VAT.

Contact us

If you operate in the hospitality and leisure sector, please get in touch with us to check that you are applying the correct rate of VAT to any supplies that you make.

November 15, 2021

AIA transitional limit extended

AIA transitional limit extended

The Annual Investment Allowance (AIA) is a capital allowance that enables you to claim an immediate deduction against your profits for qualifying capital expenditure up to the available limit. The AIA limit was temporarily increased from £200,000 to £1 million from 1 January 2019 to 31 December 2021. It was due to return to its permanent level of £200,000 from 1 January 2022. However, the Chancellor announced in his Autumn Budget that the temporary limit will be extended until 31 March 2023.

Take advantage of the higher limit

The announcement allows more time to take advantage of the higher temporary limit. If you are intending to spend more than £200,000 on plant and machinery that qualifies for the AIA, you now have until 31 March 2023 to benefit from the higher allowance and immediate relief for your expenditure.

Calculating the AIA limit for your accounting period

The AIA limit for your accounting period depends on when that period falls and on the length of that period. The limit is proportionately reduced for accounting periods of less than 12 months.

Accounting period ends on or before 31 March 2023

If your accounting period is 12 months in length and falls wholly within the period running from 1 January 2019 to 31 March 2023, the AIA limit for the period is the temporary amount of £1 million.

Consequently, if your accounting period ends on or before 31 March 2023, you will be able to benefit from the £1 million limit.

Accounting period spans 31 March 2023

Calculating your AIA limit is more complicated if your accounting periods spans 31 March 2023 as transitional rules apply.

If you are planning capital expenditure in an accounting period that spans 31 March 2023, you will need to be aware of the transitional rules. Depending on the level of investment planned, it may be advisable to incur it prior to 31 March 2023, rather than after this date.

Super-deduction for companies

Companies are able to benefit from a ‘super-deduction’ equal to 130% of qualifying expenditure incurred in the period from 1 April 2021 to 31 March 2023. It applies where the expenditure would be eligible for main rate writing-down allowances of 18%. This is a better option than the AIA as it secures a higher rate of relief. However, unincorporated businesses are unable to benefit from the super-deduction.


Companies can also benefit from a 50% first-year allowance for expenditure incurred in the same window where the expenditure would qualify for reduced rate writing-down allowances of 6%. However, where the AIA is available, this is preferable to claiming the first-year allowance as will give relief at the rate of 100% of the expenditure, rather than at the rate of 50%.

To benefit from both the super-deduction and the 50% first-year allowance, companies must incur the qualifying expenditure on or before 31 March 2023.

Speak to us

If you are planning significant capital expenditure, speak to us to find out how to maximise your available capital allowances. The timing of the expenditure will affect the allowances that are available to you.

November 8, 2021

Get ready for the plastic packaging tax

Get ready for the plastic packaging tax

The plastic packaging tax is a new tax which is being introduced from 1 April 2022. The tax aims to provide a financial incentive to use recycled plastic in plastic packaging, which in turn will boost recycling and divert plastic away from landfill.

You may have to pay the tax if you manufacture or import plastic packaging that does not contain at least 30% recycled plastic by weight. However, the tax will not apply to businesses that manufacture or import less than 10 tonnes of plastic packaging a year.

HMRC have published guidance for businesses that may fall within the scope of the tax to help them prepare for its introduction.

Scope of the tax

The plastic packaging tax applies to finished plastic packaging components that are manufactured or imported into the UK which contains less than 30% recycled plastic by weight. If you import goods in plastic packaging, for example, drink in plastic bottles, you may have to pay the tax. However, the tax only applies to the weight of the plastic packaging, not to the goods that it contains.

Exemptions

Certain types of plastic packaging are exempt from the tax, irrespective of the amount of recycled plastic packaging that they contain. The exemptions apply to:

  • plastic packaging that is manufactured or imported for use in the immediate packaging of medicinal products;
  • transport packaging used on imported goods;
  • packaging used as aircraft, ship or rail stores; and
  • components that are permanently set aside for a use other than a packaging use.  

Goods for export

Liability for the tax can be deferred for up to 12 months if you import plastic packaging for export. The liability for the tax is cancelled if the packaging is exported within 12 months of importation.

Tax credit

A tax credit will be available if packaging within the scope of the tax is converted into other packaging. This is to prevent a double liability on the same packaging.

Amount of the tax

The tax will be payable at a rate of £200 per tonne of plastic packaging which does not contain at least 30% recycled plastic.

Registering for the tax

Manufacturers and importers of plastic packaging will need to register for the tax. You will need to register if:

  • at any time after 1 April 2022, you expect to manufacture or import at least 10 tonnes of plastic packaging in the following 30 days. Where this the case, you have 30 days in which to register; or
  • the business has manufactured or imported at least 10 tonnes of plastic packaging in a 12-month period ending on the last day of a calendar month. You are liable for the tax from the first day of the next month, and must register by the first day of the following month.

In each case, only plastic packaging manufactured or imported on or after 1 April 2022 is taken into account.

It is important to note that when working out whether you need to register, the weight of all plastic packaging that you manufacture or import is taken into account, not just that containing less than 30% recycled plastic.  

Records

If you manufacture or import plastic packaging, you will need to keep records, even if you manufacture or import less than 10 tonnes annually as you will need to demonstrate to HMRC that you do not need to register for the tax. You will need to keep records of the weight of plastic packaging manufactured or imported, how much (by weight) is recycled plastic, and the amount by weight covered by an exemption.

HMRC have said that reduced record-keeping requirements will apply to businesses that manufacture or import less than 10 tonnes of plastic packaging each year, details of which are to be published in due course.

Get in touch

Talk to us if you manufacture or import plastic packaging to find out how the new tax will affect your business.

September 27, 2021

Accessing the Government Gateway

Accessing the Government Gateway

From 15 June 2021, all businesses and organisations will need multi-factor authentication in order to sign into the Government Gateway.

Multi-factor authentication

Businesses and organisations that use HMRC’s online services and which do not currently receive an access code by text or voice call, or direct to an authenticator app, will need to add a device, such as their mobile phone number, to their Government Gateway account in order to be able to sign in. Once a device has been added, you will receive an access code every time you sign in. The changes are being made to further protect Government Gateway accounts from fraud.

You do not need to do anything until the next time that you sign in. At this point you will be asked to add your new device.

Already have multi-factor authentication?

If you already have multi-factor authentication on your business’s or organisation’s Government Gateway account, nothing will change. You can continue to sign in as usual, receiving your access code in the normal way.

Additional users

If your business or organisation needs to allow employees to access your Government Gateway account, this can be done using multi-factor authentication. To do this, use the administrator and assistant functionality in your Business Tax Account to create additional users. Each user will have their own multi-factor authentication, and will need an access code to sign in.

Individuals and agents

The changes do not apply to individuals accessing their own account, or to agents.

Talk to us

Contact us to find out how to set up and use your Government Gateway account.

July 5, 2021

Budget 2021 – Business Matters

Budget 2021 – Business Matters

Coronavirus loan schemes

In 2020, the government introduced a number of government-guaranteed coronavirus loan schemes. In December 2020 the Chancellor extended, until the end of March 2021, access to the Bounce Back Loan Scheme, Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme and the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme.

Budget 2021 announced a new loan scheme to be introduced to replace those coming to an end.

From 6 April 2021 the Recovery Loan Scheme will provide lenders with a guarantee of 80% on eligible loans between £25,000 and £10 million to give them confidence in continuing to provide finance to UK businesses. The scheme will be open to all businesses, including those who have already received support under the existing COVID-19 guaranteed loan schemes.

Restart Grants

In addition Restart Grants will be provided in England of up to £6,000 per premises for non-essential retail businesses and up to £18,000 per premises for hospitality, accommodation, leisure, personal care and gym businesses. This will provide the cash certainty needed to plan ahead and safely relaunch trading over the coming months.

Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS)

Budget 2021 has confirmed details of a fourth grant. This will be 80% of three months’ average trading profits to be claimed from late April 2021. Payment will be in a single instalment capped at £7,500 in total and will cover the period February to April 2021. The scheme has been extended to those who have filed a 2019/20 self assessment tax return prior to 3 March 2021. This means that the newly self-employed from April 2019 now qualify subject to satisfying the other conditions.

A fifth and final grant was announced and can be claimed from late July 2021 to cover the period May to September 2021. This grant will be determined by a turnover test. Where the self-employed business turnover has fallen by 30% the grant will be worth 80% of three months’ average trading profits capped at £7,500. People whose turnover has fallen by less than 30% will receive a 30% grant, capped at £2,850.

Business rates

Business rates have been devolved to Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales. All four nations have introduced 100% business rates relief mainly aimed at retail, leisure and hospitality businesses. Such businesses have not had to pay business rates from 1 April 2020 to 31 March 2021.

In a Scottish Budget update statement on 16 February, the Scottish Government proposed an extension to the relief for the retail, hospitality, leisure and aviation sectors until 31 March 2022.

The Chancellor has now announced a continuation of 100% business rates relief for eligible retail, hospitality and leisure properties in England to 30 June 2021. This will be followed by 66% business rates relief for the period from 1 July 2021 to 31 March 2022, capped at £2 million per business for properties that were required to be closed on 5 January 2021, or £105,000 per business for other eligible properties. Nurseries will also qualify for relief in the same way as other eligible properties.

Following the Chancellor’s announcement, the Welsh Finance Minister has extended the rates holiday for the retail, leisure and hospitality sectors in Wales for a further 12 months.

Rates review

The government announced at Budget 2020 that it would conduct a fundamental review of the business rates system in England. The government’s objectives for the review are reducing the overall burden on business, improving the current business rates system and considering more fundamental changes in the medium-to-long term.

The government has recently announced the final report will be published in Autumn 2021 with an interim report published on 23 March.

Reduced VAT rate for hospitality sector

In July 2020, the government introduced a temporary 5% reduced rate of VAT for certain supplies of hospitality, hotel and holiday accommodation and admissions to certain attractions. In September 2020 the Chancellor extended the reduced rate to 31 March 2021. The government has now announced an extension of the reduced rate until 30 September 2021. To help businesses manage the transition back to the standard 20% rate, a 12.5% rate will apply for the subsequent six months until 31 March 2022.

Corporation tax rates

The main rate of corporation tax is currently 19% and it will remain at that rate until 1 April 2023 when the rate will increase to 25% for companies with profits over £250,000. The 19% rate will become a small profits rate payable by companies with profits of £50,000 or less. Companies with profits between £50,000 and £250,000 will pay tax at the main rate reduced by a marginal relief, providing a gradual increase in the effective corporation tax rate.

The main rate of corporation tax has been 19% since 1 April 2017. The rate for the Financial Year beginning on 1 April 2020 was due to fall to 17% but the Chancellor reversed this decision in Budget 2020.

Tax losses

A temporary extension of the period over which businesses may carry trading losses back for relief against profits of earlier years to get a repayment of tax paid will have effect for company accounting periods ending in the period 1 April 2020 to 31 March 2022 and for tax years 2020/21 and 2021/22 for unincorporated businesses.

Trade loss carry back will be extended from the current one year entitlement to a period of three years, with losses being carried back against later years first.

For companies, after carry back to the preceding year, a maximum of £2 million of unused losses will be available for carry back against profits of the same trade to the earlier two years. This £2 million limit applies separately to the unused losses of each 12 month period within the duration of the extension.

For individuals a separate £2 million cap will apply to the extended carry back of losses made in each of the tax years 2020/21 and 2021/22.

The £2 million limit applies separately to the unused losses of each tax year within the duration of the extension. Income Tax payers will not be subject to a partnership-level limit.

Super-deduction

Between 1 April 2021 and 31 March 2023, companies investing in qualifying new plant and machinery will benefit from new first year capital allowances.

Under this measure a company will be allowed to claim:

  • a super-deduction providing allowances of 130% on most new plant and machinery investments that ordinarily qualify for 18% main rate writing down allowances
  • a first year allowance of 50% on most new plant and machinery investments that ordinarily qualify for 6% special rate writing down allowances.

This relief is not available for unincorporated businesses.

First year allowances for business cars from April 2021

Budget 2020 announced the extension of 100% first year allowances for zero-emission cars, zero-emission goods vehicles and equipment for gas refuelling stations by four years from April 2021.

CO2 emission thresholds will also be amended from April 2021. These determine the rate of capital allowances available through which the capital expenditure for business cars can be written down. The thresholds will be reduced from 50g/km to 0g/km for the purpose of the first year allowances for low CO2 emission cars and from 110g/km to 50g/km for the purpose of writing down allowances (WDAs) for business cars.

Comment
The reduction in thresholds will mean that only business cars acquired with CO2 emissions of 0g/km will be eligible for first year allowances. Ultra-low emission vehicles which currently qualify for first year allowances if 50g/km or less will no longer qualify. They will be eligible for WDAs at the main rate (18%). Cars with CO2 emissions exceeding 50g/km will be eligible for WDAs at the special rate (6%).

Freeports

In 2020 the government consulted on proposals to create up to ten Freeports across the UK. The government is now proposing a range of measures covering customs, tax reliefs, planning, regeneration funding and innovation to create Freeports as national hubs for global trade and investment across the UK.

A UK Freeport will be a geographical area with a diameter up to 45km which is closely linked to a sea port, airport or rail port. East Midlands Airport, Felixstowe & Harwich, Humber, Liverpool City Region, Plymouth and South Devon, Solent, Teesside and Thames have been successful in the Freeports bidding process for England.

The government is working with devolved administrations to establish Freeports in each of the nations.

Customs benefits

Within the Freeport there will be a primary customs site and perhaps custom subzones. A customs site or subzone provides customs and tariff benefits such as:

  • duty deferral while goods remain on site
  • duty inversion if the finished goods exiting the Freeport attract a lower tariff than their component parts
  • subject to the UK’s trade agreements, customs duty exemption on goods that are imported into a Freeport, processed into finished goods and subsequently re-exported
  • simplified import procedures.

Tax benefits

Freeports may also have one or more tax sites within which tax reliefs will apply. The aim is for a single site and up to three tax sites may be allowed but the total area of the site(s) must not exceed 600 hectares. The tax site will likely be located on primarily underdeveloped land to generate new, additional productive activity in Freeport locations.

The intention is to offer:

  • Stamp Duty Land Tax relief on land purchases within Freeport tax sites in England where that property is to be used for qualifying commercial activity
  • a 10% rate of Structures and Buildings Allowance rather than the 3% rate that applies for businesses constructing or renovating structures and buildings for non-residential use
  • enhanced tax relief for qualifying new plant and machinery assets for the full cost of the qualifying investment in the same tax period the cost was incurred
  • 100% relief from business rates on certain business premises within Freeport tax sites in England.

Very broadly, the reliefs will apply for expenditure from various dates in 2021 to 30 September 2026.

In addition, a 0% rate of employer NICs on the salaries of any eligible employee working in the Freeport tax site is proposed. The relief is intended to be available for up to 9 years from April 2022.

Research and Development (R&D) tax relief

A cap on the amount of R&D tax credit which can be paid to a loss-making small or medium-sized enterprise (SME) will be introduced for accounting periods which commence on or after 1 April 2021.

Prior to the introduction of the cap, loss-making SMEs incurring qualifying expenditure on R&D activities are allowed to make a claim to surrender the unrelieved loss for a payable tax credit of up to 14.5%. For accounting periods commencing on or after 1 April 2021, payable tax credits are restricted to £20,000 plus three times the company’s relevant expenditure on workers.

Relevant expenditure on workers is the company’s PAYE and NICs for the period and importantly this is the company’s whole PAYE and NIC liability. In addition, if the company is supplied with workers by a connected company the relevant workers’ expenditure is extended to include a proportion of those worker costs.

Some companies which create or manage intellectual property and spend less than 15% with connected persons on R&D qualifying expenditure will be exempt from this cap.

Budget 2021 links:

March 4, 2021